Letterman loved his roofs.

We believe with David Letterman retiring it’s fitting to showcase a “roofing” video. . The video was filmed on a five story-flat. The noticable roofing product consisted of EPDM (black rubber) and was once installed on almost half of the flat roofs today. However, the innovative product TPO is starting to emerge as the top flat roofing product on the market. However, the roofing product didn’t bother dave. Watch as Dave throws a plethora of objects without fall protection. Oh Dave, thanks for the memories and keeping us roofers up late!

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O Big Brother, Where Art Thou? (Roofer’s Edition)

Every construction workers least favorite phrase OSHA OSHA OSHA OSHA  Oh Sh*7!

Big Brother

We have (roofing industry) experienced interesting safety regulations in the last decade. These regulations range from ropes worn, harnesses, when to wear a helmet, and so on. The ongoing regulations are important and demand the attention of every business. Employee safety is the number one concern without a doubt. Yes, it’s a job, but at the end of the day everyone is a human being! However, the matter in which our government is enforcing such rules seem discriminatory towards small and large businesses alike by enforcing economic hurdles?

So what exactly does the “supposed” economic hurdles entail? Well, majority of regulations are primarily for the employer. It’s his responsibility to monitor all aspects of an employees safety whether it be from safety education, product disclosure, industry standards, and reporting job injuries. However, how do you maintain the same rules and accountability for the ma & pa companies as you do for fortune 500 corporations? The cost to hire an outside safety company, hire an additional safety man, or purchase less bothersome safety equipment is exceptionally high. So, should the government provide grants or safety equipment tax credits? That’s a question our industry should raise moving forward.

American Dream roofer model

  • Laborer-> Installer -> Contractor -> Superintendent ->Roof Consultant -> Business Owner -> Retire

The ma & pa example:

OSHA please tell an out of the truck, licensed, and insured roofer whose completing a roofing project that he’s a menace to society. In this situation, the man is both the employer and employee, so fine him right? Very unlikely, because the job is too small.  Everyday there’s unsafe projects that are visible roadside, but OSHA couldn’t get a big fine so they drive on by or there’s no childish antics going on (explained later). Many have stated OSHA using the term “understaffed” as the reason for not catching every dangerous roofing vigilant. So, why doesn’t big brother understand that for the roofing industry. If we had the revenue to staff our own safety monitor or purchase that retractable rope, we would. Do you really believe employers want to see their employees fall three-stories?

How we feel at the moment in the roofing industry

How we feel at the moment in the roofing industry

Larger company or established enterprises:
Larger companies often have brand recognition or tool resources to qualify for important projects. Four companies bid for large project and one’s awarded it. Now you have three disgruntled companies and one whose ecstatic. The project starts and located on a busy street. The scope of work takes four weeks. Throughout this timeframe a random “good citizen regarding safety” calls OSHA.  More times than not that call is from a roofing contractor, disgruntled company, or a union issue. How many daily citizens are aware of fall protection policies or care about their neighbors roofing contractor?  OSHA drives by or waits until red flag issues arise and takes photos. A photo is evidence and there’s no disproving a photo (even if he disconnected from his harness to get down the ladder).  Is it not worth a OSHA inspector to sit in a parking lot for 2 weeks awaiting a possible fine on a $200,000 project if it’s a repeat offender? That fine would probably constitute his salary and put money in the bank.

In addition, where does the employees accountability fall? If an employer teaches, showcases, and provides equipment that exceeds the normal regulations, but an employee seen without wearing a rope (WHICH IS EXTREMELY COMMON) for one second and a OSHA officer catches it on the camera then a employer is subjected to a possible fine. Even if that employer is in the process of implementing their new safety protocol. Was Rome built in a day? Did children learn to write in a week? OSHA needs to understand the habitual nature of roofing and laboring. This job is rigorous, physically demanding, and not the ideal occupation for the normal person. Workers are not cutting corners there trying to save themselves four hours and conserver their physical energy. However, instead of being patient they instill a double fine on companies that are repeat offenders. Understand training takes time! Creating a habit takes proper reinforcement from both the government and employer.  EVEN COPS WILL TELL YOU TO SLOW DOWN AND CARRY. 

Questions to ask yourself?

Didn’t that employee choose to risk his life by neglecting use of the rope? The government acknowledges these employers as willful and wanton employers, when in reality the individual decided to neglect his safety.

Procedure Process

OSHA states they’ll listen to the offender and subject a reasonable fine. However, that seem’s extremely subjective? An individual with authority (Often the regional administrator) is in charge administrating that fine based off the “evidence” circumstance, and employers history. There’s no definitive fine cost such as local speeding tickets, reckless driving, or an unbiased jury to hear the offender. The fines are on a scale system then?

We understand members of OSHA are human beings and are well aware of a possible “there having a bad day” situation. Now a company maybe fined from a biased individual who works for the party seeking compensation and their agitated.  No jury only a judge.

Can we get answers?

Where does that money go? Payroll, governmental “policies,” or normal business expenses of OSHA? Shouldn’t that money go to a fund that increases safety programs for the roofing employees. If the awarded money went into an account that subsidized harnesses, laddervators, or hard hats, it makes it easier for ma & pa’s to finance safety services. How about that money goes to the employees who were in danger? The individuals whose lives were at risk should receive a compensation?

Also, how come hiring an outside safety company saves you 15% on your next potential fine? Outsourcing your safety program show cases your concern for the workforce? How about the hours applied in-house to show you as proof of our concern for safety and provide us the 15% discount. Where do you create these financial figures?

We need transparency.

Side thought:

Add in the disengaged worker and ask yourself if the “good citizen regarding safety” or adult tattle-tale (childish antics) call will the prompt the OSHA office to get a repeat offender rather than follow the scheduled list in which their supposedly understaffed for. OF COURSE, OSHA will go after a possible repeat conviction. They can enact a double fine for repeat offenders, so why would they risk losing a potential 100% fine increase?

I believe the largest issue for safety and the government’s inability to hold employees accountable. OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) needs to start fining the EMPLOYEES TOO. WHO GETS THE TICKET IF YOU ARE DRIVING A CAR AND IT’S YOUR BOSSES CAR, BUT YOU GET CAUGHT WITHOUT A SEATBELT? YOU. NOT YOUR BOSS. Statistics show that those that don’t wear their seatbelt are more likely to experience severe or deathly consequences. What exactly is the difference?

Rant over

If you were to ask a hundred contractors their thoughts on OSHA you’d receive a hundred different answers. Majority of them would be negative, because there’s very few positive outcomes from such programs. The organization is necessary because roofing is the fourth dangerous occupation in the United States and that specifically warrants oversight. However, oversight should be there to assist and improve the environmental conditions in reasonable techniques. The current model that’s in place does not work nor does it improve the overall state of our industry. Our government continues to do what they do best in hiding the truth behind their rational and allowing the rich get richer. We do our best to abide by current policies, but we need change, not chains.

The sexiest home purchase you could make.

We understand roofs are not exactly bringing sexy back. Seriously, we’ve been in the industry for 30 years and still waiting for a comment such as “the new roof led to my wife.” We understand those comments are reserved for cars, bars, & churches. However, what do both bars & churches have? Roofs!

A roof is a necessity that protects your home and family from the weather. Also, it increases the overall curb appeal of your home, increases the value, and an opportunity to talk with your neighbor (Thank us later). Plus, if you live in the midwest you understand the importance of a quality roof. Office Space

So, why does everyone cut corners in the researching process? It’s common for homeowners to only look at price today. Prices are important, but do we believe that the price directly correlates with the quality and service our project demands?  All items should be considered in the roof search: certifications, product, service process, and price. Each item deserves your time. However, today I want to highlight PRODUCT. There’s absolutely no reason to install a three tab shingle on your home. NO REASON AT ALL. The only time we’ll suggest it is if you’re working on your kids treehouse, but I’d question your dedication to the treehouse. The average difference in cost between architectural & three tab shingles is usually $800 to $1200. So here’s an example to put it in perspective.

Common conversation between car salesman & potential client.  Interested in any upgrades? New stereo, heated & automatic seats, & backdoor camera. All these upgrades can be yours for an additional $17 dollars a month. Potential customer “what’s sixteen more dollars a month?” Customer later purchases upgraded vehicle and throughout the next 5 years of the loan pays $1,000 for the upgrades.

Car with a lot additions

Fact’s to keep in mind:

  • Car is a mode of transportation
  • Average new car is owned for 10 years
  • Average cost of used car (1-3 year old) $15,000
  • Average cost of new car $32,000

Common conversation between roofing salesman & potential client

Interested in architectural shingles? Aesthetically sharp, 130 mph protected, better hail resistance, & weighs fifty percent more than the economical choice. You can have all these product attributes for an additional $17 dollars a month. Potential customer “umm, not sure about that” and I’ll have to discuss it with the spouse.

Fact’s to keep in mind

  • Roof protects everything inside of your home.
  • Average roof last’s between 20 to 40 years
  • A home is the largest financial investment of most adults
  • Average cost of a roof repair often no warranty & only on roof under ten years $1,500
  • Average cost of a new roof $9,000

A lot of homeowners have installed architectural shingles and insurance companies suggest it. We understand architectural shingles have only been around for 40 years whereas three-tab a hundred years, but it’s time to change. The product is thicker, weighs more, and the sealant technology allows it to withstand twice the wind of three-tab. All major manufacturers GAF, Owens Corning, CertainTeed, & TAMKO stock architectural shingles.

The next time you need a new roof PLEASE demand architectural shingles and if you believe it’s not in the budget look at the car in the driveway. Do you have heated seats, advanced CD player, or back up cameras?

Architectural shingle benefits:

Homewood Deck

Three-tab shingle benefits:

  • Classic appearance.
  • Upfront cost is cheaper than architectural
  • Most economical shingle in the market
  • 25-year warranty

99 inches of snow and counting!

The midwest strikes again! Polar Vortex 2.0? What’s the snow mean for roofing?

Every person throughout the construction industry heard rumors regarding the upcoming winter of 2015! Everyone was prepared after the winter of 2014. People upgraded their snow plow systems, stock piled salt, purchased roof rakes, and seeked parking lot contracts. The chance of another polar vortex meant potential jobs. Preparation is often central to a weather haymaker, especially when the weather bible aka “the farmers almanac” predicts a repeat.

Well, the construction industry should be happy to a degree. Because the best economy booster is often Mother Nature. Especially in the roofing industry. Recent years, a brand new industry has evolved such as storm chasers. Individuals so well tuned with insurance fine print that even your “friendly neighbor” cringes. These serviceman are the first to knock after a catastrophic or even minor storms. Masters of door-to-door marketing and extremely competitive in the roofing marketplace. Often they are the first people you see after experiencing damage without picking up your phone. These companies vary in quality, some are great and others unethical, but which industry doesn’t follow suite? What’s this mean? Why don’t we consider snow to be as much as nusicance as hail?

We call our local contractor or the guys driving bright, logo trucks after the latest rain storm or hail. Why, don’t we do the same after a midwestern winter? 20 inches of snow sitting on your roof is damaging to all your products: roofing shingles, deck, underlayment, drywall, insulation, heating bill, and more. The thing about snow too is that it could sit on your roof for awhile, whereas a hail storm comes and goes. A week of water isolated on the top of everything you own is not smart potatoes. Many homeowners would mention “well we have lifetime shingles.” I agree you purchased a quality shingle and it could last 30 years. However, did you research whether the thickness of snow for a prolong period will affect the product? Shingle specs are built off isolated studies and years of “trial & error.” It’s difficult to state whether those studies were put together based off winters that brought forth 20 inces & more, year after year. Weather is key to exterior products existence. Without the harsh weather we could live in the elements and lack appropiate shelter. The snow created plenty of construction products: insulation, ice pelts, ice & water underlayment, synthetics, & metal products that protect to date.

Ultimately we constumer have changed our attitude towards a homes. Recently, our industry has noted weather damage is a good thing, because that’s business for many. However, a loss for a gain is not right. Roofing started as a way to cover one from shelter. Shelter means survival, which means why aren’t we more proactive with things that should eliminate stress inducers than make them the actual stress inducers. The purpose of this post is ultimately to let you know that you NEED TO BE PROACTIVE with your house after this blizzard. Make a checklist of things to fix, change, or improve around the house. Don’t call your insurance because you have issues that could’ve been avoided with proper care and preparation. Take responsibility of your home, unless it’s a house (they are different). Familariize yourself with upcoming products, building codes, and ways to make your house more valuable. The internet is the most powerful learning tool. Mayber you don’t know where to go? Check out our facebook because we often post tips and videos that you could DIY. Give your house love and it becomes a home.

If your car needs an oil change you get it, hair long you cut it, and if you want to play sports you get a physical. Proper prepartion is the key to coming out of the winter 2015 with a few stratches or entering it with a lot of surgeries. Sure, at Total Roofing and Construction we love open-roof surgery, but you shouldn’t. We are here to assist and solve problems not pray for them.

The main concern this winter is ice damming and proper removal. The video below showcases great products that will benefit your roofing system and gutters during the long winter. Take notes and take action. Hope this helps

http://wgntv.com/2015/02/06/mr-fix-it-with-tips-on-removing-ice-dams/#ooid=R1NjQ3czqh7yAqXa-u5fTyouaguzcShw

Ladder Safety 101

The #1 construction accident is falling from ladders! How do you prevent these? You properly tie down the ladder, place it at an appropriate angle, and use the correct sized ladder. Following those three simple instruction’s will prevent those fall’s more times than none. We hope this video provides you a great perspective on how to correctly tie down a ladder and take precaution. Follow the instructor’s tips!

People die from 4 foot fall’s every year or become seriously injured.  We noticed people are more lackadaisical when it comes to 2 story building. Regardless of how many year’s you roofed or used a ladder take each time as it’s your first. Additionally if you don’t value your life there’s an organization called OSHA that certainly will. They’ll be making nice little call to your employer or you regarding your mishaps.

We’d also recommend having at least one hand on the ladder at all times along with your feet. Use the 3 touch step-ladder method. We understand you’ll have tool’s, the rope to the tie the ladder down, or whatever you’re bringing on your roof with you.

I have 99 problems, but a gutter isn’t one

Ice, tree limbs, snow, squirrels, bird’s, insect’s, and other debris all have one thing in common: gutter damage. The  accumulation of debris (unless you routinely clean your gutters) causes stress which pulls your gutters off the fascia board. Additionally a loose fascia board you may experience premature roof leaking, foundation problems, or even rotting fascia board. The information below may help you fix these problems rather than call a professional, who’ll recommend new ones.

Beautiful copper gutters. These are great features on houses, but cautious of thieves.

Beautiful copper gutters. These are great features on houses, but cautious of thieves.

We are not selling you gutters, but we’re selling you the industries way of quick-fix solutions.  This can save you money!

The first step to updating your current gutter system is thoroughly cleaning them! After cleaning them you’ll identify failing areas.

Items needed: Hammer, roof cement, correct galvanized nails (gutter systems vary), gloves, access to water, and patience.

1st. Clean your gutter’s

2nd. Real life scenario 

After properly setting up your ladder have another person hand you a hose or a bucket of water. You want to hose or empty a bucket of water in two directions: From the roof and directly into the gutter. The two directions provides you a overview of real-life water scenario’s. After identifying the issues you can begin solving the problems.

Ask these questions during step #2:

  • Is the water going away from the house into the gutter?
  • Are the gutter’s guiding the water to the downspout?
  • Is any leaking occurring?

Common problems and fixtures.

Loose Gutters

If the gutter’s hanging loose consider replacing nail heads with new galvanized 5 to 8 inch gutter screws (make you sure you do your research). Please avoid re-nailing the existing nails!  The prior nails already are underperforming. Over time nails lose their structural diameter from weather element’s and climate change. Additionally preemptive rust occurs regardless whether their galvanized.

Leaking Gutters

After re-anchoring the nails, grab a tube of roofing cement. This work’s well to plug holes and fill bad cuts throughout the gutter system. Holes instantly alter the directional flow of the present system. Gutters are only useful if they direct water away from your foundation, but a hole entirely disrupts the process.  You’ll notice these holes after you clean the system. Sometimes a gutter leak occurs where the pieces meet, so investigate all joints.

We hope these repair tips help you out! As any of our DIY tasks we recommend only adults do the quick-fix methods due to using a ladder and working with sharp metal.  If you have any question give us a call at 708-201-7550.

Winterize your home lately? Yahoo Edition

1. Cleaning Gutters

The first step in roof and gutter maintenance is to have the gutters cleaned out. You can do this yourself or hire a professional, but either way make sure this is taken care of late in autumn. Since leaves, acorns, and other detritus can accumulate throughout the fall, you don’t want to take care of this too early and still have problems later on.

Hiring a professional will set you back between $75 and $300, depending on the size of your home and the number of stories. The DIY approach is free unless you have to buy the materials required: ladder, bucket or pail, leaf scooper, and broom. The good news is that most people can clean out their gutters in just a few hours one weekend afternoon.

2. Installing Gutter Covers

Roof and gutter maintenance are always required at inopportune times. Kids are headed back to school, the holidays are fast approaching, and you don’t have time to get up on the roof as often as you’d like. Gutter covers or guards are a convenient solution.

Simply put, a gutter cover slows or stops the accumulation of debris in your gutters. They filter the leaves and dirt from the water so you don’t have to clean them out as often. If you plan to do it yourself, set aside an entire weekend for the job. The process is time-consuming, and you might need to take frequent breaks.

Again, you can find DIY materials at your local home improvement store. Gutter guards vary in price, but range from $3 to $6 per three-foot length of guard. Wider covers (five inches or so) cost more than narrower options (about three inches). It will be more expensive to hire a contractor, but the guards will be higher quality and will last longer.

3. Trimming Trees

Tree limbs that seem stable through the summer and fall might not be safe once they are burdened with a few pounds of snow. Winter maintenance requires trimming of all tree branches that could potentially damage the roof.

Tree trimming prices vary depending on where you live, the height of the trees, and the complexity of the job. Get quotes from several different contractors, and look for quotes between $200 and $600.

4. Repairing Leaks

The final step in winter maintenance is roof repair. Any leaks, ventilation issues, or insulation deficiencies should be handled prior to the onset of winter. Look for stains on walls, missing roof shingles, and moisture accumulation around gaskets, gutters, downspouts, ridge caps, and dormers.

Many contractors offer free inspections for those who are uncertain as to whether or not they have a leak. Remember that roofing contractors are busiest this time of year, though, so make sure to call well in advance.

Information was found on Yahoo’s home exterior page.

“This Old House” know’s roofing.

Aside

After reading a few industry expert articles we noticed “This Old House” had a fantastic Q and A article on roof replacement. We believe prior to calling a license contractor you should be aware of potential problem’s and learn about roofing issues. The more informed you are the more likely you’ll have an idea of what need’s to be done and avoid the possibility of getting taken advantage of.  There’s a few Q & A’s posted here, but we recommend checking them all out on their page. Hope this can help you out.  Remember if you have checked the web and need a license professional maybe it’s time to call Total Roofing & Construction. 

Informational

1. Q: How do you know when an asphalt shingle roof needs replacement? Are there clues to look for before telltale water stains appear on our plaster ceilings?

—Pat, Plymouth, Minn.

A: Tom Silva replies: There are several clues, and the biggest one is age. If your roof is more than 20 years old, there’s a good chance it’s due for replacement. But younger roofs can fail too, so it’s a good idea to inspect a roof at least once a year. Don’t use a ladder, though. Binoculars are easier and a lot safer, and you can spot most problems from the ground.

Here’s what to look for: numerous shingles that are lifting up, cracked or missing, with curled edges, or with smooth dark areas, which indicate that the protective granules have worn off. Also, go into the attic on a sunny day and, with the lights off, check the underside of the chimney and the stack vent. If you see little pinhole spots of light, the flashing is shot—another indication that the roofing might not be in good shape.

While you’re in the attic, scan the underside of the roof sheathing for any new signs of water staining since the last inspection, as well as any soft or moist spots, which tend to show up after a heavy rain. If these problems are widespread, it’s a sure sign that you need to call a roofer.

2. Q: A friend recently mentioned in passing he thought some of the “flashing” on my roof looked as if it were in rough shape. Can you explain exactly what roof flashing is?

—Britney, Fort Worth, Texas

A: Tom Silva replies: Flashing is just material—usually aluminum or galvanized steel—that’s used over joints in roof and wall construction to prevent water seeping in and causing damage. Depending on the style of your house’s roof, you probably have it in the valleys, around the chimney and pipes, and around any dormer windows or skylights. Most damage shows up either in flashing that’s deteriorating due to weathering and oxidizing, or in flashing that has come loose.

I can’t say for sure without seeing your roof, but most flashing problems can be patched or repaired fairly easily. Professional roofers typically cut and shape their own flashing from sheet metal, but the most common flashing pieces also come pre-formed and can be applied without much difficulty using caulking or roof cement.

A word of warning: Because of the danger involved, I never recommend people do work on roofs unless they are professionals or they’re used to being on roofs and are familiar with the one they’re working on. So if your flashing needs any significant repairs, consider hiring a contractor to do it for you.

How long does a roof replacement take?

This is undoubtedly the most frequently asked question that all homeowners have when considering replacing a roof. 

The answer, however, is not a definitive one.

The best way to determine how long it will take to replace a roof is to ask the roofing contractor when they are giving you an estimate. 
It is important to realize that not every estimate is written in stone.

A roofer may estimate that a project may take two weeks to complete, but if there are conditions that arise that delay the work, it may take longer.
Sometimes bad weather is a factor that can interfere with work, so it’s always advisable to be flexible in your expectations and plan for roof replacement when the weather is good.

Roofers may discover that more work needs to be done than was originally included in the estimate. This may be due to structural damage that was revealed once they began the project. These types of circumstances could delay the replacement project as well.

The best course of action is to discuss the length of the project with the roofer and to get several estimates before choosing the roofing contractors for the job.

Compare the different lengths of time that each roofer provides. You should always feel comfortable with the time frame that the roofing contractor provides you with and make sure that you have enough time available to handle the project.

If a roofer tells you that they believe it would take two days to complete the roofing project, and you have plans to leave town the second day of the project, you may want to reschedule.

Give yourself plenty of time to complete the project in case there are emergencies, poor weather conditions or any additional work that must be completed.

Why Pinterest is your next home improvement best friend.

Yes, you have friends, that handyman neighbor, or  know someone who possesses every possible tool (just in case something happens, but it often never does).  Every person living in a subdivision understands the value of these helpful neighbors; whether helping assemble a shed, re-shingle your roof, or join for that cold brew after an exhausting day. Face it these friends make life easier for the entire house. Maybe you’re not a DIYer and you prefer a licensed professional doing it. Whether you enjoy doing it yourself or handing matters over, you should always have complete control on your house improvement.

PInterest Logo

We believe it’s your house so don’t have neighbor’s or contractors making the decisions and trust your own gut. Every homeowner generally has an idea of what they’re looking for, but  lack creative punch. It’s easy to aisle shop at Menard’s or Home Depot to solve your need. This process drown’s creativity and hides your houses desire to stand out. Home improvement start’s with an idea and that’s where Pinterest comes in.

Before we discuss what Pinterest brings to the table, we understand not everyone has a Pinterest account or is tech savvy.  The politically correct word for these people is digital immigrant’s. It’s someone new to technologies such as the internet, laptops, or lack tech knowledge. Generally these are grandparents or people over sixty. There’s older people whom stay current with the tech times and not every young adult is tech savvy themselves. We bring this up because now Generation Y is beginning to enter the housing market. Generation Y is the title given to people born after the 80’s and early 2000’s. It’s believed that 97% of this generation either owns a laptop or computer device. This generation will utilize electronic devices and programs when making a household decision.

This generation feels comfortable navigating the internet as well as incorporating it in their daily lives. They’ll research daily tasks online or consult that handy neighbor, whereas generation Y (baby boomer’s) use the yellow pages as well as that trusted neighbor. So what can a social media platform with 3 years of experience (started in 2010) bring to the table compared to next door Chuck’s 40 years of plumbing experience down the street? The title is home improvement not home upkeep. Chuck’s plumbing experience is useful when seeking the latest plumbing for a newly refurbished kitchen/bathroom.   The house timeline remains constant for upkeep purposes like electrical work, water, roof, windows, and air conditioning. Yes we love solving common issues that plague every homeowner, but you’re trying to improve your house. Upgrading shingles, siding, windows, or gutters are ways to help increase value as well protect your investment. Maybe you want to improve your house by becoming more eco-friendly, incorporating designer sinks, or creating your own office. Before drastic decisions ask yourself what you want. Below is few bizarre questions to ask yourself.

Did you want that pirate ship tree house?

Maybe you wanted to paint your house in zebra stripes?

Grass on Roof

Can you grow grass on the roof?

These questions seem childish, but who better to consult for creativity then a child? Creative thinking allows you to differentiate your house from the next-door replica, make it your own, and inject color. We’re not requesting neighborly competition (that already happens) or paint a Van Gogh on your exterior siding. The neat thing about Pinterest is it’s free and allows you to pin your favorite projects/activities.

Often home improvement is the last household decision due to the finances, but this site provides cost-effective ways to target your wants. We believe Chuck could help you think abstract or build a cornhole set worth bragging about, but Pinterest allows you to view thousands of ideas in the matter of a click. The famous Marie Curie said “Be less curious about people and more about ideas.” Marie Curie might be a Nobel Prize winning physicist yet she understood something about thinking outside the box.

Pinterest provides you an escape from the traditional house style or bland colors. We are not requesting you to build a replica of the Solider Field space ship on your house, merely enjoy the improvement process and love the finished product. If sticking with the household status quo pleases you Pinterest most certainly will frighten you.  Remain aware of protecting the longevity of your asset as well. If you trust your gut you’ll make the best decision to satisfy your want. One Pinterest page has an entire board dedicated to houses that resemble the fable of the “old lady who lives in a shoe.”  Living in a shoe style house may not appeal to you, but maybe living in an entirely eco-friendly house does.

House in a shoe

We promise that you’ll find one intriguing picture or idea that you try emulating yourself.  These ideas range from picture frames, baskets, or wall painting techniques. If your house is in dire need of a little interior design injection please check out this site. Various ideas range from low to high-end of the price  scale. Finding something to improve that hideous room or make you the talk of the subdivision lies in Pinterest. Maybe Chuck’s innovative cornhole paint job does interest you, but there’s no way it’ll trump the swimming pool in your dining room.